Arts

Performing Shakespeares: (dis)locating the authentic in a Korean intercultural Dream
How is authenticity evaluated and assessed in a hybrid intercultural Shakespeare performance? The Yohangza theatre company's A Midsummer Night's Dream, staged as part of the 2012 Globe-to-Globe festival, typifies intercultural hybridity and challenges our understanding of Shakespeare, originality and authenticity by highlighting different engagements with Shakespearean performativity. This prod...


New horizons: Australian nurses at work in World War I
More than 3000 nurses from Australia served with the Australian Army Nursing Service or the British nursing services during World War I. These nurses served in various theatres of war including Egypt, France, India, Greece, Italy and England. They worked in numerous roles including as a surgical team nurse close to the front working under fire; nursing on hospital ships carrying the sick and wo...
To exhibit or be exhibited: the visual art of Vetkat Regopstaan Boesman Kruiper
This article examines the visual art of the late San ‘Bushman’ artist Vetkat Regopstaan Kruiper. The significance of Kruiper's artistic work is explored in order to call into question two problematic assumptions: first, that visual art amongst the San ended with rock art, turning the ‘Bushman’ artist into a vanished specimen, and, second, that what is found amongst the San today is not,...


The music of dead sisters: a feminist comparison of two folktales about singing bones and reeds
This article compares and contrasts two folktales. The first is the traditional ballad, ‘The twa sisters’, collected by Francis J. Child in the 19th century. The Canadian folksinger Loreena McKennitt compiled a variant of this, called ‘The bonny swans’. Many of these ballads feature a musical instrument composed of the bones of the slain sister, which sings the name of her killer, who i...
The creation of the eland: a close reading of a Drakensberg San narrative
For the most part, the narratives recounted by the San informant Qing to the magistrate, Joseph Orpen, who had employed him as a guide and scout in the Maloti mountains during the Langalibalele rebellion of 1873, have been discussed in terms of rock art. This is unsurprising since Qing's narratives were told, at least in part, in response to Orpen's questions about the rock art they saw on thei...


Development narratives: the value of multiple voices and ontologies in Kalahari research
This article is based on findings from a PhD study that explored the development communication processes between partners in the establishment of !Xaus Lodge in the Kgalagadi Transfrontier Park, South Africa. Framed within the critical indigenous qualitative research approach, it reveals the importance of local narratives in the coproduction of knowledge that may guide development initiatives. ...
Ethics and Fictive Imagining
Sometimes it is wrong to imagine or take pleasure in imagining certain things, and likewise it is sometimes wrong to prompt these things. Some argue that certain fictive imaginings—imaginings of fictional states of affairs—are intrinsically wrong or that taking pleasure in certain fictive imaginings is wrong and so prompting either would also be wrong. These claims sometimes also serve as p...

Narrative and Character Formation
I defend the claim that fictional narratives provide cognitive benefits to readers in virtue of helping them to understand character. Fictions allow readers to rehearse the skill of selecting and organizing into narratives those episodes of a life that reflect traits or values. Two further benefits follow: first, fictional narratives provide character models that we can apply to real-life indiv...
Upholding Standards: A Realist Ontology of Standard Form Jazz
In “All Play and No Work,” Andrew Kania claims that standard form jazz involves no works, only performances. This article responds to Kania by defending one of the alternative ontological proposals that he rejects, namely, that jazz works are ontologically continuous with works of classical music. I call this alternative “the standard view,” and I argue that it is the default position i...

A Matter of Life and Death”: Kawabata on the Value of Art after the Atomic Bombings
This article explores the possible interpretations—and the implications of those interpretations—of a comment about the importance of art made by Yasunari Kawabata (1899–1972), later the first Japanese Nobel laureate for literature: that “looking at old works of art is a matter of life and death.” (In 1949, Kawabata visited Hiroshima in his capacity as president of the Japan literary ...
Butter Knives and Screwdrivers: An Intentionalist Defense of Radical Constructivism
Robert Stecker has posed a dilemma for the constructivist theory of interpretation: either interpretations consist of statements with truth values or they do not. Stecker argues that either way, they cannot change the meaning of an artwork. In this article, I argue contra Stecker that if interpretations consist of meaning declarations rather than statements, they can change the meanings of the ...

Conceptual Art, Ideas, and Ontology
Peter Goldie and Elisabeth Schellekens have recently articulated the Idea Idea, the thesis that “in conceptual art, there is no physical medium: the medium is the idea.” But what is an idea, and in the case of works such as Duchamp's Fountain, how does the idea relate to the urinal? In answering these questions, it becomes apparent that the Idea Idea should be rejected. After showing this, ...
The Complete Work
What is it for a work of art to be complete? In this article, we argue that an artwork is complete just in case the artist has acquired a completion disposition with respect to her work—a disposition grounded in certain cognitive mechanisms to refrain from making significant changes to the work. We begin by explaining why the complete/incomplete distinction with respect to artworks is both pr...
A Thaumatin-Like Protein, Rj4, Controls Nodule Symbiotic Specificity in Soybean
Soybeans exhibit a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with soil bacteria of the genera Bradyrhizobium and Ensifer/Sinorhizobium in a unique organ, the root nodule. It has been well known that nodulation of soybean is controlled by several host genes referred to as Rj (rj) genes. Among these genes, a dominant allele, Rj4, restricts nodulation with specific bacterial strains such as B. elkanii USDA61 and ...
Artlore: An Introduction to Recurring Motifs Generated by the Study of Fine Art
This article provides an introductory discussion of the ways in which popular perceptions of artworks, artists, and the creative process have generated a repertoire of recurring motifs. Sometimes reinforced by art historical research and documentary evidence and sometimes at variance with all such scholarship, the tropes of ‘artlore’ constitute a catalogue of persistent story types that spr...