Prior research has shown that various situational factors and behaviors can affect one’s perception of whether a rape has occurred. Moreover, some hold false beliefs about rape. This can also affect one’s perception of ambiguous situations. This study included the administration of a survey to 584 college students; the survey examined the prevalence of rape myths and responses to vignettes of potential rape scenarios. It was found that although the majority of this sample did not support rape myths, male students were significantly more likely than female students to support rape myths. Furthermore, approximately 20% of students did support one subscale of the rape myth scale: He didn’t mean to [commit rape]. The results also revealed an interaction effect between the observer’s sex and the victim’s sex, suggesting a complex gender relationship.
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