Occupational exposure to chromium (Cr) and nickel (Ni) compounds may result in adverse health effects. This study aimed to determine hematological changes in blood and hair in electroplating workers. Twenty-three electroplating workers and seven control subjects with no history of occupational exposure to Cr were recruited in Madurai district, South India. Metal levels in erythrocytes were determined by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrophotometer. Ni was found to accumulate at higher levels than Cr in workers than the control subjects. There was no significant change in blood glucose, serum creatinine, and hemoglobin content in workers compared to the control subjects even after stratification by potential confounding factors, such as age, gender, and smoking status. The findings in this study indicated that there was detectable Cr and Ni exposure in electroplating workers. Low-level occupational Cr and Ni exposure induced higher erythrocyte sedimentation and increased the percentage of eosinophi.
Related Content
Health hazards among workers in plastic industry
Styrene is a basic building block for manufacturing thousands of products throughout the world. The present study aimed to (1) detect the presence of styrene and/or its metabolites in the workers in one of the Egyptian plastic factories; demonstrate some common health effects of styrene exposure ...


Genotoxicity and oxidative stress in chromium-exposed tannery workers in north India
Trivalent chromium (Cr) is an environmental contaminant, which is extensively used in tanning industries throughout the world and causes various forms of health hazards in tannery workers. Therefore, a cross-sectional study design was used to evaluate the DNA damage and oxidative stress condition...
Impact of aluminum exposure on lung
Aluminum (Al) metal is considered one of the most benign industrial metals. Although the harmful effects of Al on respiratory health have been denied by some studies, others reported its noxious effect on the lung through spirometric measurements. This work aimed at studying the effect of Al fume...


Municipal landfill leachate induces hepatotoxicity and oxidative stress in rats
Human beings are more often exposed to complex mixtures of hazardous chemicals than single toxicant. The present study investigated the effects of Olushosun municipal landfill leachate (OMLL) from Ojota in Lagos State of Nigeria on hepatic function and some biomarkers of oxidative stress in adult...
Hematological effects of benzene exposure with emphasis on muconic acid as biomarker in exposed workers
Human exposure to benzene in work environment is a global occupational health problem. It is established that benzene requires to be metabolized to induce its effects. Benzene has been associated with various hematotoxins and carcinogens. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ben...

How to measure hazards/risks following exposures to nanoscale or pigment-grade titanium dioxide particles
Due to its multifunctional applications, titanium dioxide particles have widespread use in commerce. The particle-types function as sources of pigment color, in food products, anti-bacterial components, ultraviolet radiation scavengers, catalysts, as well as in cosmetics. Because of its inherent ...
Lung tumor promotion by chromium-containing welding particulate matter in a mouse model
Epidemiology suggests that occupational exposure to welding particulate matter (PM) may increase lung cancer risk. However, animal studies are lacking to conclusively link welding with an increased risk. PM derived from stainless steel (SS) welding contains carcinogenic metals such as hexavalent ...

Engineered nanomaterials: exposures, hazards, and risk prevention
Nanotechnology presents the possibility of revolutionizing many aspects of our lives. People in many settings (academic, small and large industrial, and the general public in industrialized nations) are either developing or using engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) or ENM-containing products. However...
Occupational genotoxicity among copper smelters
Occupational exposure in a copper smelting industry may produce various adverse health effects including cancer. Despite a number of well-documented studies reporting an increased risk of cancer among copper smelter workers, the data on genotoxic effects in this industry are scarce. In view of th...

Occupational lead exposure among automotive garage workers – a case study for Jimma town, Ethiopia
In Ethiopia, although there are numerous small-scale and medium industries which use lead-based raw materials that may pose health risks to workers, there are no workplace regulations for lead exposure. Moreover, there are no studies carried out on the blood lead levels (BLLs) of workers or on th...